Minimalism and progressive enhancement

Posted in Design and Development

I’ve been enjoying reading though Adam Silver’s archive of articles around accessibility and inclusive design over the past few days, and his take on progressive enhancement really struck a chord:

Progressive enhancement makes us think about what happens when things fail. It allows us to build experiences with resilience baked in. But equally, it makes us think about whether an enhancement is needed at all; and if it is, how best to go about it.

That last sentence is the key for me. It brings Dieter Rams’ tenth principle of good design to mind:

Good design involves as little design as possible

A website should be carefully thought through: every tag, script, style, page, paragraph, and full-stop.

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