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Giving your Git stash a name

Posted in Development and Git

Out of the box, git stash will automatically name the stash as follows:

  1. Stash index number
  2. The branch you were on when the changes were stashed
  3. The commit hash commit name before the stash was created

Number 3 isn’t all that useful if you’re not planning on applying your stash any time soon. I prefer to name the stash more descriptively so that if I pick it up in, say, a month’s time, I’ll have a good idea of what I was doing.

git stash save "Nicely descriptive name of the stash"

Now, when I’m looking over my list of stashes, I’ll be able to remember what each one was for.

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