If it’s not progressively enhanced, it’s not accessible

Posted in Accessibility

In his latest article, Adam Silver does an excellent job of summarising the many ways JavaScript can fail.

the problem is less about the 1% of users who always visit your site without JavaScript and more about the 1% of visits to your site which result in users experiencing your site without JavaScript. And through no fault of their own

It comes down to lack of progressive enhancement. Websites that don’t work when JavaScript fails should be considered inaccessible.

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