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Design for everyone

Posted in Accessibility and Design

The closing comments of a recent CSS-Tricks article are great:

Just remember: apply carefully, and always be mindful of accessibility/UX. Magically evolving designs are great, but only if they are great for everyone.

Design is a hugely responsible role, and one of those responsibilities is ensuring everyone can use our websites, products, services, and applications.

We have to think about the content; for example, should we:

  • Use video if we can’t afford the time to add subtitles or a transcription?
  • Use abbreviations and symbols without explaining them first?
  • Link to other places when it isn’t clear where the user will land?

Then there’s how users interact with our site:

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg…

I’m reminded of a line from, of all places, Jurassic Park:

Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should.

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More posts

Here are a couple more posts for you to enjoy. If that’s not enough, have a look at the full list.

  1. Accessible animation without the compromise

    Accessible animated GIFs are rubbish. Instead of compromising our animations in order to meet WCAG, we should be checking what our users prefer.

  2. Accessibility doesn’t stop at WCAG compliance

    While it’s true that WCAG represents a solid baseline, there’s a lot more we should be doing to make our work truly accessible.